A Vector 3000, can have many options, the chemical system being one of them. If you bought this system used, then it probably had chem dispense originally installed. These options are programmed in the PLC and can be updated by reprogramming that option as "uninstalled".   That should clear it....

Thanks for your question.  Yes, you will want to have Temperature Switch.   Germane is classified as a Flammable/Toxic gas, and a temperature switch or flame detector which is a UVIR (Ultraviolet Infrared detector) is “suggested” by the American Engineering Standard.   Even though it's only “suggested”, this is not a safety issue you want to leave open for interpretation.  Specifically in this case, the use of a Temperature Switch in a gas cabinet  is a 'no brainer' since the cost of is 20X cheaper than a UVIR, and gives you the confidence of early detection and shutdown, should a...

[Full Question here] We will soon be adding an LPCVD tool for a new doping process that we need to bring on line. The process calls for arsine, which we do not have a lot of experience with, but we do know that it is pretty nasty. We’ll need to add a gas cabinet and a scrubber to the Fab to handle this gas. What would you recommend for a scrubber? Is there anything I need to do special to house the arsine bottle? Do I need dual contained tubing due to its toxicity?  Thank you for the help. Answer:  Thank you...

It depends on the purity requirement.  Do you have a ppm or ppb purity requirement?  Is there point of use filtration and/or purification?  In general, if the allowable contaminants at the point of use are in the ppb range or less, then electropolished tubing and components are recommended.  If the range is ppm for contaminants, then non-electropolished is probably suitable.  System capacity and tube run length could also influence the decision.  For low capacity and short run length, the cost premium for electropolished won’t be great so if there is any uncertainty in the allowable contaminant level, electropolished will alleviate...

Until recently, the answer for high purity systems would have been to use integrated valves (combined tee and branch valve) welded to sections of tubing.  Recently, several companies have developed a more cost effective solution, savings ~ 20% of installed cost, utilizing “pulled” tees and small branch valves.  For example, formerly for a 2 inch manifold with ¾” branch valves,   integrated valves would be machined from stainless steel bar stock that was ~ 2 inch wide, 2 inch tube stubs would be welded to the machined tee and a ¾” valve machined into the same block of stainless steel.  With...

There are several ways to do this, but in all cases the site weather is the most important factor affecting the cost. For buildings or areas within buildings that draw in quantities of outdoor air and exhaust it through equipment and are not significantly affected by solar heat gains or losses, the annual energy cost can either be determined manually using “BIN data” for the city of interest and applying thermodynamic and fluid flow equations for the fresh air and exhaust flow rates, air cooling and heating processes, and air conditioning system efficiency.  “BIN data” is a form of weather data...

This can be quite simple if a balancing report, design drawings, and calculations exist for the system, or quite time consuming if no data is available.  In general, a pressure loss calculation must be updated or done from “scratch” starting with a duct layout that includes flow in every “critical path between the furthest point of the system and the stack.  With the calculated branch velocities and fitting loss coefficients (from ASHRAE or SMACNA guides), pressure losses can be calculated by branch and system including the scrubber.  The total pressure loss is then compared to the fan flow and pressure...

The short answer is that there are software based programs that utilize the Colebrook and Darcy Equations that can provide you an answer but you will need a layout to estimate the tube lengths and the number and types of fittings and valves in the system.    More information on this can be found here: https://www.criticalsystemsinc.com/determining-tube-pipe-size-for-pressurized-gas-system...

Sizing tubes or pipes is easily accomplished with software based on the Colebrook Equation and the Darcy Equation.  The Colebrook Equation requires an iterative solution for friction factor thus lending itself to a computer application.  The input parameters are pipe or tube outside diameter, wall thickness, gas pressure, gas temperature, flow rates, tube or pipe roughness, gas viscosity, and gas density at atmospheric pressure. For example, flowing 75 scfm of Argon gas (density = 0.1037 lb/ft3 and 0.0225 cP viscosity) through a 1 inch OD x 0.065 wall electropolished tube at 120 psig and 85 OF, the calculated pressure drop would...